Tag Archives: articles

Memories of My Favorite Old Local Movie Theatres Growing Up

25 Aug

Fashion Valley Four
 
Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlor (looked a lot like the Northridge loc. above)
I have so many great memories of this place. Birthday photos with the flocked wall paper.
I hear they are headed for a comeback!

Cinema 21
Cinerama
This photo from 1987 shows the forgettable “Some Kind of Wonderful”playing at the unforgettable Loma theater.

The Loma Theater

Valley Circle Theater
Capri Park Blvd.

The Guild, (original), Hillcrest
The Ken, Adams Ave.
Movie Ad from Newspaper

The College Four, demolished

My blog post about The Fox Theatre is listed below:
 http://missionhillslife.blogspot.com/2011/08/memories-of-mission-hills-fox-theatre.html

Great Drive In Memories here: we used to go to the Midway all the time. http://www.sandiegoreader.com/weblogs/bands/2008/aug/01/drive-in-theaters-in-san-diego-complete-illustrate/

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San Diego Reader | "Plundering Historic Plaques" by dorianh

2 Aug
Owners of historically-designated homes in Uptown are on the lookout for thieves. The thieves are not the run of the mill hoodlums but instead are run of the Mill’s Act burglars.

The thieves are ripping off gold plaques from historically designated homes. Last week, historic plaques were torn from pillars in front of four homes in the Inspiration Heights district of Mission Hills. The thieves also snatched plaques from two homes along Fort Stockton Boulevard and one from the Griswold Building at the corner of Washington Street and Goldfinch.

Mission Hills isn’t the only neighborhood that has reported the plundering of plaques.

“Historic plaques have also been stolen from homes in Burlingame and from other older San Diego communities, not to mention the thief of plaques in Presidio Park,” reads the warning sent out by community organization, Heart of Kensington.

“There appears to be a mini-crime wave targeting our historic communities and our historic markers.”

Image

San Diego Reader | “Plundering Historic Plaques” by dorianh

San Diego Reader | “Plundering Historic Plaques” by dorianh

2 Aug
Owners of historically-designated homes in Uptown are on the lookout for thieves. The thieves are not the run of the mill hoodlums but instead are run of the Mill’s Act burglars.

The thieves are ripping off gold plaques from historically designated homes. Last week, historic plaques were torn from pillars in front of four homes in the Inspiration Heights district of Mission Hills. The thieves also snatched plaques from two homes along Fort Stockton Boulevard and one from the Griswold Building at the corner of Washington Street and Goldfinch.

Mission Hills isn’t the only neighborhood that has reported the plundering of plaques.

“Historic plaques have also been stolen from homes in Burlingame and from other older San Diego communities, not to mention the thief of plaques in Presidio Park,” reads the warning sent out by community organization, Heart of Kensington.

“There appears to be a mini-crime wave targeting our historic communities and our historic markers.”

Image

San Diego Reader | “Plundering Historic Plaques” by dorianh

Video: Historic Markers Stolen From Mission Hills Pillars – Print This Story News Story – KGTV San Diego

2 Aug

Markers Stolen Are 102 Years Old (see link for video)

A piece of history in Mission Hills is gone after four century-old bronze markers were taken from two pillars earlier this week.”I was ticked off,” said Allen Hazard, a Mission Hills homeowner and local historian.Hazard said he still can’t believe the markers were taken from the pillars on Sunset Boulevard near Alameda Drive sometime Monday evening or Tuesday morning.The name on the markers — Inspiration Heights — was the name of a new subdivision in 1909.In one old drawing Hazard showed 10News, the pillars with the markers were used in a brochure to attract buyers.”It appears they were yanked out, possibly with a crowbar. I think Mission Hills and the Uptown area has been robbed of a key part of our identity and history,” said Hazard.The thief or thieves may have a history of targeting history.”I heard a loud thud just before I was going to bed,” said resident Sean-Xavier Neath.In late June, a few blocks away, the homeowner looked outside around midnight and saw a man running to a car carrying garbage bags. The man apparently stole the homeowner’s plaque designating his historic home. The plaque is made of bronze alloy, which includes copper. The thief would also take two other plaques.Homeowner Bobby Sparks had a plaque stolen from his home.”It feels like a violation. Someone coming in and jacking your plaque off your home,” said Sparks.Hazard said, “102 years of history is gone for someone to get a couple hundred bucks. That’s outrageous.”Police are looking into a possible connection between the two strings of thefts.It is believed the markers were stolen for their scrap value.As for the historic home plaque, one homeowner paid more than $700 for his.

Historic Markers Stolen From Mission Hills Pillars – Print This Story News Story – KGTV San Diego

Video: Giant Mural In Hillcrest Slowly Disappearing – San Diego News Story – KGTV San Diego

30 Jul

Mural By Street Artist Shepard Fairey On Side Of Urban Outfitters On Fifth Avenue

http://www.wedesignandconquer.com/giant-shepard-wall-in-sd/


The fate of a giant mural in Hillcrest – made by a world-renowned street artist and former San Diegan – remains uncertain on Tuesday.
The mural made a huge splash a year ago when it appeared on the side of an Urban Outfitters store near Washington Street and Fifth Avenue.
It was created by top street artist Shepard Fairey, who is also known for creating the “Hope” posters that supported then-candidate Barack Obama.
Much of Fairey’s work is designed to elicit reaction and a search for meaning. That message was contained in the local mural with the words “obey,” “never trust your own eyes,” and “believe what you are told.”
The display was part of a city-wide exhibit and was commissioned by the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego. Now, the display is vanishing from public view.
“It makes me feel empty inside,” said Jon Konstintin, who lives six blocks from the mural.
Slab by slab, the mural is being covered up by the walls of a new retail center nearby.”It’s upsetting. 
It’s sad,” said Crystal Islas, an employee at Urban Outfitters. “It’s almost like Hillcrest is losing a bit of its character.”
The display, which was made by plastering digital images, was a temporary display that was supposed to be taken down seven months ago. The display itself is also deteriorating.
The building owners, who sponsored the museum exhibits, convinced Fairey to leave the mural up.”
We thought it might be fun as folklore of the piece to leave the piece,” said Jeffrey Silverman, the president of Carleton Management. “It almost encapsulates it into a time capsule.”
Before it completely disappears, the mural is continuing to do what is was designed to do: elicit reaction.
The building’s owners plan to ask Fairey if they can remove part of the mural and frame it inside the new restaurant.rs plan to ask Fairey if they can remove part of the mural and frame it inside the new restaurant.

The blogger at bobfab.com posted more photos of the soon-to-be-obscured Shepard Fairey mural in Hillcrest. We spoke to the property owner and wrote about and photographed the fleeting street art recently.
Photographs in main article copied from: 

The fate of a giant mural in Hillcrest – made by a world-renowned street artist and former San Diegan – remains uncertain on Tuesday.

Redistricting Commission finalizes preliminary map | LGBT Weekly

28 Jul

The San Diego Redistricting Commission is expected to release its preliminary map at its July 21 meeting, showing how the City Council districts could be redrawn. The commission is hosting public hearings before it finalizes the map.

PROPOSED PRELIMINARY MAP

Using federal census data, the Redistricting Commission has to modify city council districts every ten years to adjust for population changes. This year, the city is also adding a 9th district, in accordance of the new strong mayor format approved by the voters last year.

The redistricting process must also preserve “identifiable communities of interest.” The LGBT neighborhoods were recognized as a community of interest 20 years ago with the creation of District 3, which includes areas like Hillcrest, North Park and City Heights.

Since the creation of the LGBT-friendly district after the 1980 census, San Diego voters have elected a gay or lesbian city councilmember.

A preview of an un-approved preliminary map, presented at Tuesday’s commission meeting, shows a shift of District 3 to the west. The proposal adds Little Italy, Old Town, Mission Hills, Bankers Hill and downtown to the west, and eliminates Talmadge, City Heights, portions of Normal Heights and Kensington. Azalea Park, which has catered to LGBT homeowners for years, is also being eliminated from the new LGBT-friendly district. The eastern portions of the existing District 3 are now included in the proposed District 9.

PROPOSED District 3

The proposed District 3 is very similar to a map presented to the commission by the LGBT Redistricting Task Force. The task force has been very involved in representing the LGBT community at commission public hearings and meetings.

“I am very happy with this map of D3,” said Linda Perine, LGBT Redistricting Task Force chairwoman.

PROPOSED District 3

If the preliminary map is approved at the July 21 meeting, the Redistricting Commission will host five post map public hearings to listen to public feedback based on the preliminary map. Those meetings are: July 26, 6 p.m. at the Logan Heights Branch Library; July 28, 6 p.m. at the Thurgood Marshall Middle School Theater; July 30, 10 a.m. at the Balboa Park Palisades Building Recital Hall; Aug. 1, 6 p.m. at the UTC Forum Hall; and Aug. 3, 6 p.m. at the Joan B. Kroc Center Multipurpose Room.

The LGBT Redistricting Task Force is meeting this Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m. at Filter Coffee Shop (1295 University Ave. in Hillcrest) to plan its approach to the post map hearings.

“Right now, things look pretty darn good,” the task force wrote on its Facebook page, “but they can change in a heartbeat.”

To join the LGBT Redistricting Task Force, contact Perine at 858-775-2950. For more information about the Commission, log on to sandiego.gov/redistricting or call 619-533-3060.

Redistricting Commission finalizes preliminary map | LGBT Weekly

City’s building height ordinance extended for 6 months – SignOnSanDiego.com

27 Jul

— The San Diego City Council has passed an extension to a temporary 2008 ordinance restricting building heights in three neighborhoods.
The council voted 7-0 to add six more months to the Interim Height Ordinance, which will now be in effect until January 2012. The law prevents new construction and renovations from exceeding 50 feet in Mission Hills and 65 feet in Hillcrest.
Structures can only breach the 65-foot limit in Bankers Hill with special approval from either the Planning Commission or City Council, Uptown Planners Chairman Leo Wilson said.
David Alvarez was absent from Tuesday morning’s session and did not vote.
The original ordinance, meant to freeze building heights until the completion of a new community plan update, was set to expire early this year. However, the council approved an initial six-month extension in January. Tuesday’s second extension will be the last permitted under the law.
“It’s my personal hope that this will light a fire underneath all the stakeholders to make sure the community plan update is completed as soon as possible,” Councilman Todd Gloria said. “I want to seek consensus in these communities so that we can make sure that the development goes where it’s supposed to go.”
Despite the extension, it is unlikely the community plan update will be completed in the next six months. In fact, council members said Tuesday they don’t expect it to be done for at least 18 months.
Wilson said after the meeting that it could take even longer, and he anticipates a new ordinance will be drafted in the next six months to keep the height limits in place until the community plan update is finished.
One councilman, Kevin Faulconer, said his patience with the process is running out. Faulconer voted in favor of the extension but said he supported it, “reluctantly.”
“We want this done, and we want it done sooner rather than later,” Faulconer said. “It’s not an open-ended commitment. We need to bring this to a resolution.”

nathan.max@uniontrib.com • (619) 718-5252 • Twitter: @natemax

City’s building height ordinance extended for 6 months – SignOnSanDiego.com